“Showgirl” Analysis

by: Frenzy Luzincourt, Maya Sienkiewicz, Guy Carlos


The kinds of analysis that were did focused on the cultural and historical context around the painting, as well as the artist's intent. We discussed perversion of the girl, the cultural concepts of what it meant to be in the 1920s regarding jazz and even race relations. We also discussed the contrast in the colors, white the bright reds, yellows, and blues, in comparison with the dark and grey colors. Additionally we paid attention to the clothing worn by the subjects in the paintings, looking at their patterns and what we thought the materials used to create it were. The author's intent was also heavily questioned, from whether the painting has racial implications, or was more focused on the music and aesthetic progress of the times. Although, we pretty much analyzed it from top to bottom, we did not spend time on the possible political implications of that time.
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Kiss Me and You’ll Kiss The ‘Lasses

by: Maggie Capozzoli-Cavota


I analyzed the color and style of the painting, a textural analysis, and connecting analysis from other objects in the painting. I also began do a contextual analysis but didn't get to finish going into speculation about a deeper meaning. I also didn't get to speculate on the author and perhaps what this piece could represent in the time it was painted.I would have liked to have explored the context of the painting to the time period. On further research it did take place during the 1800s, 1856, and was actually a statement about women independence during the time. The artist herself was the main provider for her family during this time, which wasn't too common but still speaks on many levels to the reader.
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MACAULAY SEMINAR I-HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT

by: Jessica Bash, Elijah Maduro, Bryan Laluces, Darya Ryndych


(the reflection is part of the video)
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George Washington

by: Nathan Vulakh, Vadim Mell, Matthew Tuckman, Michael Itshakov, and Gabriel Vizgan


We looked at the symbolism behind the position of Washington, the objects in the painting, and the different aspects of the paint. We didn't pay attention to the art method. We would have like to pay more attention to his paint style if we had more time.
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Findings at the Brooklyn Museum

by: Taylor Burgos, Anisa Lajka, Katlyn Palmatier, Briana Atkinsr


We should have focused more on the formal properties of the piece such as the lines, shape and scale. Instead, we focused more on the colors, shading and the contrast between light and dark.
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Findings at the Brooklyn Museum

by: taylor Burgos, Anisa Lajka, Katlyn Palmatier, Briana Atkins


We should have focused more on the formal properties of the piece such as the size, scale and lines. Instead, we focused on the colors and contrast in light that was used.
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A Storm in the Rocky Mountains

by: Noel George, Katie Johnson, George Kenefati, Sam Kramer, Rebecca Regine, Taryn Watkins


We used description, formal properties, content, historical context, the artist's intention, and our own interpretation in our analysis. However, we did not use interrogation. We would have liked to have spent more time analyzing the smaller details of such a large painting.
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Brooklyn Museum Analysis

by: Alexandra Kononenko, Benjamin Freeman, Megan Govin, Guy Villette, Luisa Anaya, Danny Jimenez, Jehan Miah


We analyzed both the details, setting, and possible significance or use. We did not analyze enough the emotional response that the piece evokes in us. We could've researched the historical background of the images depicted.
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A Morning Snow – Hudson River

by: Susan Evans, Reid Vero, Steven Moshier, Brianna Gelsomini, Chunilall Kissoon, Nathaly Garzon


While analyzing A Morning Snow – Hudson River by George Wesley Bellows, we elaborated well upon description, formal properties, content, historical context, and art style. There was room to further develop our ideas on the artist's intention and interrogation.
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Cecelia Beaux, Mrs. Roberts

by: Priyanka Thomas, Soon-Hee Shimizu, Abir Petiwala, Sam George, and Ariane Marchese


Our group analyzed Ceclia Beaux’s Mrs. Robert Abbe at the Brooklyn Museum. We discussed multiple facets of the painting and focused on the artistic choices of Beaux. The highly experimental style of the painter portrays the originality and peculiarity of her work. The dress in particular reflected this unusual style. At first glance, it seems like a messily painted dress, but her life long devotion to art allows us to view this style as an intentional choice. We connected this dress to the defiance of a woman in a time period where women were expected to be compliant and unoriginal. This was a reflection of the artist herself, because she was an unmarried woman, unusual in her time.
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