In Danger by Hendrik Willem Mesdag

by: Mariana Adieb


In my conversation at the museum, I included many descriptions to account for the overall general picture and also the small details in it. I discussed formal properties such as the shape and lines that can be drawn for deeper analysis and the painter's choice of color, tone and composition. In the middle and toward the end, I asked questions about the art, in which I think about ideas that cannot be answered by just observing the painting. If I had more time, I would have included more interpretation of the artist's intention and also add historical context.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on In Danger by Hendrik Willem Mesdag

A Morning Snow Analysis

by: Sanzida Talukder, Saudia Baksh, Masuma Sultana


We began by simply describing what we saw. These descriptive analyses led to questions that were asked about the particular artwork. The first aspect that was noticed was the mood of the piece and how the color composition affected the overall feeling of the painting. We questioned the historical context and hypothesized what the artist's intention was for creating this artwork. We did not analyze the context of the painting but this could have been helpful in understanding the subject matter on a deeper level. More investigation on the artist's purpose could have also be done to further develop our understanding of the artwork as a whole.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on A Morning Snow Analysis

Untitled (Egungun Series)

by: Shelly Zou, Nickolas Almodovar, Wayne Chim, Bryan Rosendo


First, we observed the various textures and colors the subject wore and the contrasting background. From there, we were able to draw various conclusions such as: the subject wore garments of cultural importance and the outfit itself drew attention away from the person wearing it and to the (what we later discovered) spirit it was depicting.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , | Comments Off on Untitled (Egungun Series)

The Doge’s Palace

by: Leeba Erlbaum, David Fodiman, Alexandros Gloor, Victoria McGrath


Things we analyzed:

– the objective form of the work
– the use of color and geometry
– the use of light and focus
– the perspective of the painter
– its relation to philosophy (Plato's world of ideas)
– the subject matter of the work as opposed to its form
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The Doge’s Palace

A Storm in the Rocky Mountains

by: Noel George, Katie Johnson, George Kenefati, Sam Kramer, Rebecca Regine, Taryn Watkins


We used description, formal properties, content, historical context, the artist's intention, and our own interpretation in our analysis. However, we did not use interrogation. We would have liked to have spent more time analyzing the smaller details of such a large painting.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on A Storm in the Rocky Mountains

Columbus Before The Queen

by: Andrew Palacios, Samuel Meyerovich, Ashir Raffe, Daniel Ostrom


The historical significance of this piece is one that echoes the discovery of the New World. This discovery, in turn, sparked the interest of Europeans to build what is America today. For that reason, it is incredible how Columbus is the centerpiece of the painting and is thus wearing bright red clothing. The artist's intentions for this piece is to demonstrate the power that the New World – America – already has despite not being influenced by colonization. This is further presented by the use of bright colors around Columbus and those near him. The proud look of the subject of the painting is contrasted by the varying expressions of the king, queen, and royal subjects. Nevertheless, this is a powerful piece due to the foreshadowing of American values, culture, and civilization that will begin to emerge in the near future within the context of this masterpiece.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , | Comments Off on Columbus Before The Queen

“Last Days of Pompeii” James Hamilton

by: Michael Miranda, Adam McKoy, Christo Vairamon, Ishraq Khan, Mohammed Kallash


We did mostly literal observation regarding the use of colors and brightness. We touched upon emotional reactions. We didn't use very technical art critic terms as we lack the expertise. We would like to have had more time to edit the video.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , , | Comments Off on “Last Days of Pompeii” James Hamilton

Erotica in Ancient Egypt

by: Katarina Depasquale, Tayba Aziz, Nailah Garard


Historical Context, Description, interrogation, subject matter, content. We did not do formal properties. If we had more time we would want to more on the formal properties and all the structural components of the piece.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Erotica in Ancient Egypt

The First Harvest in the Wilderness – Asher B. Durand

by: Karen Li, Jackie Li, Emily Burrag, Alisa Mizukami


Some analysis we did in the conversation are historical context, interrogation, formal properties, and artist intention. The historical context of the manifest destiny guided our interpretation of the artwork, because we understood why the location was a forest, and why there were so many people that were painted in the background. We also interpreted some imagery as a symbol for god, or hope for the future because we knew that the manifest destiny dealt with such subject matters. We also discussed the different formal qualities, including contrast of color between the forest and the sky, and the composition of the painting that guides the viewer from one aspect of the painting to another. The emotions that were evoked were also sadness, due to the desolate nature of the painting.

We covered most of the basic analysis, however we did not discuss much of the artist's intention. If we had more time, we would have liked to discuss what the artist might have wanted to convey in this specific painting, as opposed to some of the other paintings that also depict the manifest destiny.
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged , , | Comments Off on The First Harvest in the Wilderness – Asher B. Durand

The End of the Working Day by Jules Breton

by: Prithviraj Talukdar, Will Carranza, Mia Chin


Our group did a lot of formal analysis including the artistic techniques used, the incredible details, and tried to broaden our meta-analysis to things people wouldn't really think about right away. Take the gold frame for example; the frame was way to fancy for a photo that was about the lowest working class in France at the time, the farmers. We could have done some more personal analysis, like how it made us feel. If we had more time we would have tried to research Jules Breton and figure out why he painted this painting.dd
Direct Link to your video (for embedding on a class site or saving on your computer)

| Tagged | Comments Off on The End of the Working Day by Jules Breton