Increasing Mac Productivity: Hot Corners

If you’re interested in Mac tips and tricks, follow this productivity series at http://macaulay.cuny.edu/eportfolios/utopiaofdaniel/category/technology-and-gaming/mac-productivity-tips/.

Your screen is a very powerful thing. On a Mac, incorporating “Hot Corners” into the screen makes it an even more powerful tool, providing immediate shortcuts to various parts of the computer. All you have to do is drag your mouse to any of the four corners of your screen, and different things will happen. Sounds interesting? Let’s do it.

To access Hot Corners settings, first open your System Preferences panel. Select “Desktop and Screen Saver,” and then make sure you’re on the “Screen Saver” tab. At the bottom left-hand corner of the window, you should see a little button that reads “Hot Corners…” After clicking on that, a drop down menu should appear.

In this drop down menu, there’s four sub-drop down menus where you can select what each corner of the screen does. For my work flow, I’ve set the upper right-hand corner to open up the Launchpad and the upper left-hand corner to put the computer to sleep. Depending on where your Dock is or where you generally move your mouse, you might find yourself accidentally activating a Hot Corner. So it’s important to set each corner based on how frequently you move your cursor in that area of the screen.

My personal Hot Corners settings. You can access this menu via "System Preferences," "Desktop and Screen Saver," and "Hot Corners..." under the Screen Saver tab.

My personal Hot Corners settings. You can access this menu via “System Preferences,” “Desktop and Screen Saver,” and “Hot Corners…” under the Screen Saver tab.

 

Each corner can be set to access anything from enabling and disabling the screen saver to accessing the desktop or launchpad menus. If you’re feeling really ambitious, you can even set your Mac to “Lock” by setting one of the four corners to put the computer to sleep, and then going into the “Security and Privacy” section of System Preferences and opting to require a password after waking your computer from sleep.

In "Security and Privacy," you can make your make require your password upon waking up, in effect creating a user lock on your Mac whenever you put it to sleep.

In “Security and Privacy,” you can make your make require your password upon waking up, in effect creating a user lock on your Mac whenever you put it to sleep.

 

If you like what you’ve seen here, don’t be afraid to comment and voice your opinion! I love feedback. Be sure to stay tuned to The Utopia of Daniel for more Mac Productivity Tips in the future.

About Daniel Scarpati

Daniel is a university and Rudin scholar double majoring in Film Production and TV/Radio at CUNY Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College.